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Social Media Uprising in the Chinese-speaking World [Kindle Edition]

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Hong Kong In-Media has published the e-version of its research work on Social Media and Mobilization at Amazon under the title: Social Media Uprising in the Chinese-speaking World.

This book is an elaborated study of the use of social media in grassroots struggles in China, Hong Kong, Macao, Taiwan and Malaysia by local researchers and activists. We would like to work out a self-finance model for research and publication of social movement and media activism experience in Asia, in particular among Chinese speaking communities. Please support us by buying a copy.

You may also download a sample preview copy here [pdf].

Below is an introduction written by Jack Qui, a scholar on New media and politics from the Chinese University of Hong Kong:

China: The World of Guarantee

2010-12-15 - LEE Chi-Leung
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Editor note: This is an excerpt translation of an investigative report in CBN Weekly on the monitoring of online service providers through the Guarantee system. The article tells the story behind the suspension of DNS of Wangju (http://www.ju690.cn) and Shiguang ( http://www.mtime.com) websites as a result of their failure in complying to the requirement of web-censors. The article was removed from CBN Weekly's website soon after it was published. You can find the full the Chinese version here.

China: 50 Cent Party Roams on Internet

2010-10-20 - LEE Chi-Leung
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(Editor note: This article is a part of an investigative report originally published in Changcheng Monthly (長城月報)in Chinese. The report, written by ChangLei (張蕾)traces the history of government and party hired online commentators, the so-called 50 Cent Party.)

Since October 2004, Communication Office of Changsha Municipal Party Committee has been insistent in delivering a daily opinion digest, Changsha Yuqing Kuaibao (《長沙輿情快報》) to major officials of Municipal Party Committee and the Municipal Government. For this, the office have recruited members from units such as the Municipal Party Committee Office and Training School of Changsha Municipal Committee of CPC to form a team of net commentators. These astroturfing commentators are hired with a basic monthly salary of RMB 600, with commissions depending on number of posts they posted. Each of their posts would be logged on a “net commentators management system” and counts for 50 cents.

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